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Nearly 15 Percent of Connecticut Households Surveyed Unable to Afford Enough Food New FRAC Report Highlights Data for First Half of 2010

Nearly 15 percent of Connecticut residents surveyed in the first half of 2010 said that in the prior 12 months there were times when they did not have enough money to buy the food they needed for themselves or their family. These survey results are according to the Food Research and Action Center’s series of analyses of survey data on food hardship collected by Gallup as part of the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index. This particular analysis looks at the most recent available food hardship rates by state, for the first half of 2010.

In the year-round survey that began in January 2008, 1,000 individuals per day were asked, “Have there been times in the past 12 months when you did not have enough money to buy food that you or your family needed?”

Additionally, the report compares results in the 12 month period from July 2008 through June 2009, to the 12 months from July 2009 through June 2010, and finds that food hardship in Connecticut decreased by less than one percent over that time period. These two, 12-month segments were selected to see if there was any significant change from the time of the heart of the recession to the first year of recovery.

“Although the food hardship rate in Connecticut has not increased, the number of families who continue to struggle to put food on the table remains very high at 1 in 7 surveyed,” said Connecticut Food Bank Chief Executive Officer Nancy L. Carrington. “It will be challenging, but in the New Year we must do all that we can to reduce these statistics which can represent your family, friends or neighbors who are affected by unemployment, underemployment, poverty and food hardship.”

The full report is available at www.frac.org

This article was posted in Hunger 101, Public Awareness, Recession.

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